Baby Fever

I am a 234 days / 7 months 3 weeks & 3 days old baby

Symptoms
A fever is usually a sign that the body is waging a war against infection. Taking your baby's temperature can confirm your suspicions and help you and your child's doctor figure out the best way to get your baby back on the road to health.

Most doctors — and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) — agree that a normal body temperature for a healthy baby is between 97 and 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (36 to 38 degrees Celsius). If your baby's rectal temperature is above this range, he has a fever.[1]


How should I take my child's temperature?
Taking baby's temperature
The most accurate way to take your child's temperature is orally or rectally with a digital thermometer. In a child younger than about 4 years, take the temperature rectally. In an older child, take it orally.

* Mercury thermometers should not be used. Mercury is an environmental toxin, and you don't want to risk exposing your family to it. If you have a mercury thermometer at home, you should remove it and use a digital thermometer.
* Don't bundle your baby or child up too tightly before taking his or her temperature.
* Never leave your child alone while taking his or her temperature.[2]

Causes

There can be many causes for a baby’s fever. Dehydration is one. Or the infant might be over-bundled with clothes in a relatively warm environment­ - the rule of thumb is to dress your baby in just one more layer of clothing than you are comfortable in.

Most commonly, fever is caused by an infection. The body’s immune system senses the “foreign invader” - such as bacteria or a virus - and sends a chemical message to the brain’s temperature centre instructing it to crank up the heat inside the body.[3]

Treatment

Treatment of a fever can include using an over-the-counter fever reducer, including products that contain acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil). If you child has an infection, using a fever reducer will not help your child to get better any faster, but they will probably make him feel better.

You should also give your child a lot of fluids when he has a fever, so that he does not get dehydrated. Keep in mind that treatment of a fever is usually to help your child feel better, so if he has a fever, but doesn't feel bad, especially if the fever is low grade, then you do not need to treat the fever.[4]


---
Notes;

[1] Babycenter.com
[2] Familydoctor.org
[3] Webmd.com
[4] Keepkidshealthy.com